Bear Activity Returns to one Snoqualmie Neighborhood, Resident Captures Baby Bears’ Fence Tightrope Walk

On April 25, 2013, the City of Snoqualmie warned, “Bear activity may increase in Snoqualmie neighborhoods over the next few weeks as they look for food following winter months. This has been the pattern in the past in Snoqualmie.”

This morning, May 25th, one homeowner captured some proof that the city’s warning is indeed coming true – the bears are back.  Colin Davis, a resident of the Heights neighborhood, took these pictures of local bear cubs, including a tightrope-like, fence balancing act courtesy of the young bears.

Around 7:35AM today, neighbors spotted what they believed to be the cubs’ mother and scared her away by setting off a car alarm.  Then 10 minutes later they heard a loud noise and looked out to see the cubs balancing on the fence. The bears walked across of the top of the fence Davis shares with a neighbor on SE Carmichael Street, jumped down and then entered the woods behind the stretch of homes.

This Snoqualmie Ridge Heights neighborhood is no stranger to bears, as it is bordered by thick woods.  It was here last year that one bear was shot and killed by a homeowner and the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife also captured another black bear that later had to be put down due to injury to its eyes.  Fish and Wildlife officials believe that bear had either rice or small pellets fired at it, damaging its eyesight and ability to be re-introduced into the wild.

Safety tips for living in neighborhoods that have black bear activity are posted on the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife website.

To deter bear activity, city officials recommend residents not put out garbage containers until the morning of their scheduled pick up day and to bring those containers in promptly; storing garbage and recycle containers in garages; and removing bird feeders and outdoor pet food dishes.

Snoqualmie residents are also asked to report bear sightings by calling 911.  Officers will then be dispatched to the location in an effort to help track local bear activity with the Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Bear cubs walking the tight rope of a fence top on Carmichael Ave in Snoqualmie

Bear cubs walking the tight rope of a fence top on SE Carmichael Street in Snoqualmie

Whoops.  Now the bear cub has to get down off that fence.

Whoops. Now the bear cub has to get down off that fence.

Bear cubs heading into the woods behind Carmichael Ave.

Bear cubs heading into the woods behind Carmichael Ave.

 

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